A power shawl

I think this might be my favorite shawl ever. Ever. It was a relaxing knit, but the best part is the perfection in its drape. Say hello to Ashburnashburn-9
Many Ravelers have cut out some of the repeats, citing how large the shawl is. It is very long from end to end, but I think it works out tremendously well that way. If you want a nice collar of a shawl, you can have it. If you want it wrapped about the shoulders, it’s long enough to stay without slipping. I was a bit of a bad girl and didn’t block this, but it’s nearly all garter stitch and looks pretty neat. If it was lace I’d make myself do it. It came off of the needles last night and I paraded around in it until I finally had to go to bed. I strongly considered cuddling with it.ashburn-7I considered dropping a few of the end repeats just because I wanted it on my person that very minute, but I held out and made it as the pattern specified. And I couldn’t be happier. ashburn-6The yarns are Malabrigo Sock in Terracotta (the orange), The Yarns of Rhichard Devrieze Peppino in Lake of Bays (the speckled one), and Hazel Knits Artisan Sock in Aventurine (the turquoise). I think the Hazel Knits was the most captivating to me and I want a million more things made out of that exact color. ashburn-8This is definitely a power shawl. Is there such a thing?! I feel bold and amazing with this on. My heart is nearly broken that it’s far too hot today to wear it, but I’m hopeful that cooler mornings might let me wear it for a bit in the coming week.

Now I should return to my Featherweight cardigan with full force, since it has a chance to be worn this season.

All of the colors of Spring

marin-3The Marin shawl in Rhichard Devrieze Peppino (color: Flowers) is finished. This feels like the perfect thing for spring. The weather has been mostly lovely here with cooler mornings that require longer sleeves and some afternoons that don’t. Having a cadre of colorful shawls is handy for adding a bit of light warmth that can easily be removed if the weather warms. marinThis was a fairly quick project, finished in a little over a week. This is my second Marin and this time I didn’t run out of yarn. I used a size 5 needle, rather than a 4 like last time. I like the slightly looser drape of this version. It stays around my neck more easily than it’s sibling, with less fussing. marin-4The colors make me happy. As an added bonus, this piece will work with many outfits. marin-2I didn’t make any mods to this pattern, aside from adjusting to a size 5 needle to get gauge. Now I’m on to the next shawl. More soon.

Screaming spring greens

I’m so happy to finally blog about Marin. I finished this almost a month ago and should have taken pictures with it when we went on vacation in St. Louis, but I guess I was distracted by being on vacation. marinThe yarn is Hazel Knits Artisan sock in Euphorbia and I used all but a yard of the skein. For those that wish to knit Marin, do heed the numerous Ravelry project pages that speak about running out of yarn. On this post I wrote about how I ran out of yarn about 1.5″ from the end of the tip. I unravelled one of the full chart repeats and reknit with a size smaller needle because I didn’t want to wait for a new skein of yarn, and this was purchased so long ago that I would have to stripe in a second skein to blend skeins of different dye lots. The magic of hand dyed yarns can also be a downfall if you don’t have enough in the same dye lot! marin-2Reknitting with a smaller needle was not noticeable in my opinion. When looking at the whole piece I can’t even tell which side I did it on after blocking. If I knit this again I’d use a slightly larger skein of sock yarn. Hazel Knits has 400 yards. I’d just choose one that had even 10-15 more yards and that would be plenty. marin-3I adore this color. The shawl was fun to knit and is reversible. It was a pretty quick knit. Despite being one that has a chart to pay attention to, I finished it in about a week with the reknitting. marin-4It’s a fairly small shawl. I find those fit into my wardrobe better than large shawls. I will likely knit this pattern again. I love the scalloped edges and little bit of cabling.

Still bed resting away, despite my occasional sneaking out to take blog photos… Jude commented on my first post about bed rest that perhaps one of the reasons Z came early was due to the stress of us moving while I was pregnant last time. Well, apparently my being pregnant just coincides with us having to move because we found out from our landlord that we would have to move by the time our lease is up in July. My head exploded a little last week when I found this out and I was freaked, but we have some promising options that have come up in only a week that make me very hopeful. Moving with a newborn and a toddler would not be my first preference, but we will manage.

Any guesses on when this kid is going to make an appearance? My bet is the 17th or 19th or 23rd, simply because I like prime numbers.

Grrrrrrrrrr

So this happened: IMG_20150317_091535I was a mere 1.5 inches from finishing Marin and I ran out of yarn. A knitter’s worst nightmare. I measured the remaining skein at the halfway point and I had over half of the ball left. I’m not sure how this happened, but apparently I must have gotten slightly looser on the second half. The gauge measures the same, but it feels a bit looser.

First I contemplated buying another ball of yarn. I love this color and would happily make something else out of it (Hazel Knits Euphorbia), but I didn’t want to pay $24 plus shipping and have to wait at least 5 days to be able to finish the project for less than two inches of knitting. So, before I take that step I’m ripping back a repeat and a half of the big chart and I’m going down a needle size. I think this will snug up my gauge enough, and hopefully I’ll scrape by with enough yarn. I really don’t think it’s going to be noticeable later at all, especially after blocking.

If I knit this thing again (because it’s lovely and I probably will), I might just use a 2. The recommended needle is a US 5, but I would have defaulted to a 4 since I’m a loose knitter. After reading so many Ravelry project page comments about people going down a needle size, I decided a US 3 was the best bet for me, but I guess I just got too relaxed in the second half. Sigh. Here I go again: marin-2

If 1500 other knitters can do it, so can I

I started a Marin a couple of days ago. I’ve had the pattern for awhile, and even the yarn in mind that I thought would be perfect for it. I just hadn’t been in a shawl mood for a really long time. Since spring seems finally just around the corner, it is a good time for a transition piece.marin

Well, turns out my brain doesn’t work sometimes. I’m chalking it up to pregnancy brain. There are over 1500 other successful projects on Ravelry, so I knew it was definitely me, not the pattern. I was ending up with stockinette stitch and there clearly is none on the pattern. Guess who forgot how to read a chart? I finally ripped back a bit and looked at the written out directions compared to the chart. I forgot that often a symbol stands for knit on the RS (right side) and the same symbol becomes a purl on the WS (wrong side). I was just looking at the little blank spaces for knit and dashes for purls as if they were absolute, and I was happily creating stockinette for awhile until I realized, “Hey, there’s no stockinette on this thing.”

I’m still crossing my fingers that everything turns out well because several knitters have commented that they didn’t have enough yarn. As I have only one skein of this amazing Hazel Knits Euphorbia and it’s a mere 15 yards more than the pattern calls for, I’m really hoping it works out. Some have knit it at a tighter gauge to make it come out closer to the specified yardage. After reading a few of those project comments I decided to go ahead and rip back and knit the thing on US 3 needles. Gauge isn’t usually crucial for shawls, but I’d rather make sure I can make it through the pattern since I only have one skein. I’m really beginning to be an expert at the beginning of this shawl, y’all.

How I block lace

Recently I knit an Echo Flower Shawl with Classic Elite Mountain Top Vail. It was a present to my friend Jenni for her upcoming nuptials next weekend. It’s very hard for me to wait to surprise people, so I had to give it to her a weekend early. I don’t expect that it will be cool enough for her to wear on her wedding day with her dress, but I wanted her to have it anyway.

I don’t have a picture of her modeling it yet, but I will show you how I blocked it.  I think lace needs a nice wet blocking.

lace blockingThe shawl is bound off, without ends woven in, and is a lovely, but lumpy mess.

lace blocking-2I use lukewarm water and some no-rinse wool wash (Eucalan lavender scented in my case). For the wool wash, a teeny dribble goes a long way.

lace blocking-3I let this baby soak for at least a 1/2 an hour or more. You want the fibers to get wet and relax.

lace blocking-4Then I delicately lift the wet wool from the bowl.

lace blocking-5Gently squeeze out the water. Never twist or wring the item or you may cause some unwanted felting. You can also felt items if you switch from hot to cold or vice versa, so if you do need to rinse your item, make sure you use water the same temperature.

lace blocking-6Then I lay out a large bath towel, lay down the gently squeezed shawl, fold it in half lengthwise,and roll it up.

lace blocking-7I stand on it and move my feet across it a couple of times to squeeze out as much of the water as I can. If you are wet blocking a sweater, you might need more than one towel.

lace blocking-9In this case, I used some blocking wires from Knit Picks. I only used the wires on the long straight edge of the shawl, and I picked up the edge loop along the garter stitch. A little over halfway through I transitioned to a second wire to have enough length to stretch the shawl across it as long as I wanted it to be. lace blocking-10In this final picture, you can see my pins. I use straight T-pins. I took this picture, then looked again and straightened the spine of the shawl after I put my camera away. In this shot the center line is leaning a little to the right.

At the top, I first pinned right under the blocking wire, then I started at the bottom center and pulled the pieces out as far as it seemed like the shawl should go (I could have re-read the pattern for schematics, but I was too in the moment). Then I worked outward, trying to make the left and right symmetrical as I went. It probably took about an hour total, but that’s counting the soaking time for the shawl. Positioning and pinning took me about 20-30 minutes.

I really loved making this shawl. It became predictable, but of course it was something I had to have some evening focus time to put on this. I didn’t cart it to work, and I thought about pulling it out last Thursday at knit night, but lace and wine don’t always mix, so I left it alone. I’m very happy with the result, and Jenni was joyful when she received it, so I consider it a great success.

Today is the first day back to school on campus. There is a flurry of movement and energy that wasn’t present mere days ago. It’s overwhelming, but also makes for some great people watching. Since school is in session, it’s also the last day for my sale! Use BACK2SCHOOL to get a 50% discount on  TuxedoPrufrockBetwixtWendingRuffaluffagusThe Unexpected Hat, and my newest, Firefly Seeker for till midnight (Central Time) today.

Hope everyone is having a lovely Monday!

Edited to add: Blocking board is from WEBS, the larger size.

Summer, stay.

Time flies too, too quickly. I can’t believe it’s already July. This month is full of fun and challenges. I have a big bite of my dissertation proposal to finish and polish before it goes to my dissertation chair, Zooey is turning ONE (how is that possible already?), I turn 32, and we traveled this week to see some family members that we don’t see often enough. One of these family members is my brother’s girlfriend, Brenna. She was kind enough to meander around the yard taking pictures of me in this giant shawl, Nuvem.

nuvem-3It’s a miracle that I kept going through those insanely long ruffle rows, but I told myself that the ball knits up just as quickly even if the row is really really long. I was finishing a ball (236 yards) in about 2-4 days depending on how much time I had available to knit.

nuvem-4Each row took slightly over 7 grams. I left a little over 12 grams to bind off. Judging from other Ravelry users with helpful notes (thank you!), that was enough. I had one gram left over!  I went up 3 needle sizes for a bind off and bound off somewhat loosely.

nuvem-2This shawl is a lovely 58″ by 68″ size. I was a little worried that it would seem too thick to wrap around my neck since Classic Elite Mountaintop Vail is more like a fingering weight than a lace weight, but it feels fine wrapped any way.

nuvemI ended up using one skein each of slate, steel, parchment, sand, and adobe (from center out), and I used two skeins of camel since I knew the ruffle would gobble up a ton of yarn.

Here is a second representation of its size:

nuvem-5Seems like it could work well as a personal blanket too. I put together the 32″ and 24″ cables in my set of Addi Clicks to knit most of this project when it quickly overwhelmed at 40″ needle. The stitches had little room to move at the end, but the way they were packed on the needle and ready to go made them knit quickly.

nuvem-6I blocked it lightly by hanging it over my shower curtain rod and steaming it gently. Alpaca does not have as much elasticity as many wool fibers. I thought it best to avoid a wet block for this project. I’m pleased with the result, though I could still work on a couple of tiny spots with ladders from working on one 40″ circular at the beginning.

Summer, take your time. Let’s keep it slow.

If you feel like pattern shopping, my birthday sale only goes till the 14th of this month. Use the code Happy32 for 32% off all of my paid patterns.